November 26, 2019

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7 Pricing Myths to Stop Believing If You Ever Hope to Sell Your House

Pricing your own home is hard. Of course, you want to make a profit. Of course, all that money you spent installing a swimming pool or a half-bath will be recouped, because you're leaving your digs in better shape than when you bought it, right? 


Well, not necessarily.

 

Too many home sellers fall prey to myths about home pricing that seem to make sense at first, but don't jive with the reality of real estate markets today. To make sure you haven't bought into any of this—since the buyers you're trying to woo sure haven't—here are some common pricing myths you'll want to rinse from your brain so you kick off your home-selling venture with realistic expectations. 

 

1. You always make money when you sell a home


Sure, real estate tends to appreciate over time: Home prices increased by approximately 5% by the end of 2017 and continue rising 3.5% in 2018. But selling your home for more than you paid is by no means a given, and your return on investment can vary greatly based on where you live.

 

2. Price your house high to make big bucks


We know what you’re thinking: “Hey, it’s worth a shot!” But if you start with some sky-high asking price, you'll soon come back to Earth when you realize that an overpriced home just won't sell.


While the payday might sound appealing, you're actually sacrificing your best marketing time in exchange for the remote possibility that someone will overpay for your home.


RELATED: Home Won’t Sell? Check The Price


While certain buyers might be suckered in, this becomes far less likely if they're working with a buyer's agent who will know all too well when a home is overpriced, and advise their client to steer clear. And this can lead to problems down the road (as our next myth indicates).


3. If your home's overpriced, it's no big deal to lower it later


Sorry, but overpricing your home isn't easily fixed just by lowering it later on. The reason: Homes that have lingered on the market for months make buyers presume that something must be wrong. As such, they might still steer clear, or offer even less than the price you're now asking.

 

FREE DOWNLOAD: Home Didn't Sell? Let's Get It Sold Fast!


Bottom line: Price your home appropriately from the beginning for your best shot at having a quick and easy sale.


RELATED: What's My Home Worth?


4. Pricing your home low means you won't make as much money


Similarly, sellers are often leery of pricing their home on the low end. But as counter-intuitive as this seems, this strategy can often pay off big-time. Here's why: Low-priced homes drum up tons of interest, which could result in a bidding war that could drive your home's price past your wildest dreams.


5. You can add the cost of any renovations you've made


Let's say you overhauled your kitchen or added a deck. It stands to reason that whatever money you paid for these improvements will be recouped in full once you sell—after all, your home's new owners are inheriting all your hard work.


The reality: While your renovations might see some return on investment, you'll rarely recoup the whole amount. On average, you can expect to get back 64% of every dollar you spend on home improvements. Plus that profit can vary greatly based on which renovation you do.


6. A past appraisal will help you pinpoint the right price


If you have an appraisal in hand, from when you bought or refinanced your house, you might think that’s a logical place to start to price your home. It's not!


An appraisal assigns your home a value based on market conditions at a specific date, so it becomes old news very quickly. In fact, lenders typically won’t accept appraisals that are more than 60 days old because lenders know markets can change quickly.


7. Your agent might overprice the house to make a bigger commission


Don’t even go there.


While it’s true that an agent’s commission is based on the selling price of a house, the disparity will end up being negligible. For example, the difference in commission between a $300,000 house and one that's $310,000 is about $150.


No real estate agent is going to lose a sale for the sake of a couple hundred dollars.


YOUR TURN


Do you have any home selling myths to add to our list? Sound off on The Shannon McCarthy Team Facebook Page or our Twitter or Instagram feeds. And don’t forget to subscribe to our monthly HOME ADVICEtm email newsletter for articles like this delivered straight to your inbox. You may unsubscribe at any time.

 

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